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Buddhas in my pocket

An Australian Buddhist Pilgrimage

Month

May 2017

A force of positivity

As I watched this person work I was really struck by her purposeful gait and boundless energy. Here was someone, nearly in her 7 th decade of this life, living so fully engaged in whatever she was doing.
She was endlessly positive.
Sometimes people are cheery on a surface level but underneath things can be turbulent.
However, with this inspiring woman, automatically seeing the best in people went down many layers deep.
Spending time around someone like that really brings confidence and trust easily into communication and connection.
When I offered her a Buddha she chose one mainly because of the colour.
It reminded her a little of pale New Zealand greenstone.
She also liked the shape.
She told me as we chatted, that as soon as she picked it up she realised she would hand it on to a friend- it really needed to go to her friend.
Sometimes the Buddhas in my Pocket are like that.
They still have a little more of a journey to go before they arrive fully into a new home .

Buddha donated by Ineke, New South Wales, Australia IMG_0378

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Infinite potential

IMG_0015Someone who offered to hand on one of the Buddhas in my Pocket recently sent me her story …….

” I gave the small Buddha to my partner, who is suffering from depression and anxiety and is in a very constricted mental state.

He accepted the Buddha with sincererity knowing how important such a gift was to me. But when I told him it represented infinite potential he scoffed and said ‘well that is not me’.

Such a sad thing, as I have always seen his radiant potential and really believe in him.

I hope one day he will believe in himself again too.”

Buddha donated by Dhammannyu Hove UK

In the hands of the Order – Nagasuri

This is my gold kesa and a beautiful black bowl given to me by a great friend, Chittamodini, on the occasion of my Ordination. It is a symbol of the Buddha’s begging bowl and that for me represents renounciation.
Although I was Ordained with a white kesa I knew in my heart of heart’s at my Ordination that I would take the gold kesa as an Anagarika as soon as was possible.
Now I am so attached to my gold kesa it is quite ironic!
In the year that I had a white kesa I forgot it a number of times but in the 16 years with the gold one I have only done that once or twice.
It’s amusing to me because of course when becoming an Anigarika, underlying the celibacy vow is homelessness, careerlessness and possessionlessness.
The bowl has meant more and more to me over time. In my sadhana practice of Buddha Shakyamuni one imagines a lotus floating in the top of it. It’s a symbol of wisdom and compassion as well as emptiness.
It also seems it as a beautiful symbol of stillness, simplicity and contentment.
I really like this quote by Sharon Salzburg.
“She who knows that enough is enough will always have enough.”IMG_0397

The second Buddha in the drawer

A friend in Toowoomba knew someone who might benefit from receiving a little Buddha from my Pocket . This is what she wrote after it found its new home .

“This Buddha was given so someone I felt for so much as she was going through a hard time. She was someone caring for a loved one with a terminal illness.

There was nothing I personally could do to change the situation.
I could listen, encourage and share some of the insights of the Dharma.
Then I thought of the 2nd and last little Buddha I had chosen from you which was resting in my drawer. In that moment I knew it was the best thing I could give her.
She was very moved to receive it.”

Buddha donated by Don, Melbourne.

IMG_0344

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Buddhas in my pocket

An Australian Buddhist Pilgrimage